My Top 5 Cars Of The 80s
8 min read

My Top 5 Cars Of The 80s

Featured Builds
8/25/2021
/
8 min read

The 1980s produced some of the most incredible vehicles made in the Japanese Domestic Market (JDM). Over the span of 10 years, several critical technological advances were made, new EPA standards were introduced, and Japanese Automanufactures were producing not just economy vehicles but performance-inspired ones as well. Here is a quick list of my top 10, in no particular order.

#1) FB/SA and FC Mazda RX7s


Technically, the first generation of RX7 was produced in the late 1970s, but let's forget that for a second. From 1978 to 1985, the first generation of RX7 was a force to be reckoned with during its release. Equipped with a Wankel Rotary engine, which Mazda has become synonymous with, this car introduced not-so-old technology to a new market. You can find this chassis competing in various motorsports, from drag racing, drifting to road racing; it has undoubtedly made a name for itself.
The FC (second generation) of RX7 hit the market in the mid-1980s into the 2000s. The FC chassis is iconic, if you ask me. I'm sure we have all seen the Initial D memes (that was me, I still watch it with my kids), but Initial D didn't make the chassis what it is today. The everyday enthusiasts and professional shops who have pushed this chassis and its powerplants to their limits are what makes this model special. The Turbo II model will go down in history as one of Mazda's greatest chassis' (looking at you FD kids), even if they can be generally found on jack stands or a lift.

@simp.ai on Instagram
2) Toyota Supra (not the Fast and Furious one)


The Toyota Supra will always be a mainstay in Toyota's stable. We know of the Supra featured in the Fast and Furious film, but there the true hero, in my opinion, is the MA70. The MA70 featured a straight-six twin-turbocharged engine titled the 7M-GTE. Think of this as the 1JZ-GTE's older, weird cousin that packed a punch. The 7M-GTE produced about 230hp and 196lb-ft of torque. The A70 Supra's had flat front ends, pop-up headlights and were equipped with a hardtop, sunroof, or T-Tops.

@valormk3
3) Toyota MR2


The second generation of MR2, SW20s, is probably the most popular generation of MR2. Before the SW20 came to life, the first generation of MR2 was building the future for MR2 enthusiasts to come. The AW11 chassis was boxy, small, and highly nimble. Being produced with a 1.6L NA engine, the 4AGE, Toyota also offered a supercharged model from the factory. The supercharged engine, the 4AGZE, certainly was not the most potent powerplant in that era. However, this Roots-type supercharged produced a whopping 145hp from the factory in a vehicle that weighed only 2500lbs.

@mk1_mr2_supercharger
4) Nissan 280z


In my opinion (don't come at me), the Nissan 280z was one of Nissan's greatest productions cars, next to the GTR. The 280z carried on the 240z's roots, even after losing the Datsun name in the early 1980s. The 280z had the option of a turbocharged engine in 1980, boosting horsepower numbers to about 197hp. The iconic front end, a slight protrusion from the hood, recessed headlights, and overall sleek design was a fresh take on sports cars in the 1980s.

@datzilla_78
5) Honda CRX


Yes, you read that correctly. I love the Honda CRX. If there is one thing that almost every car enthusiast can relate to, it's money. It costs a metric f*ck ton of money to build a project car. The aftermarket Honda community has been able to produce quality parts for various Honda platforms that are affordable. The Honda CRX has a cult-like following of enthusiasts (in a good way). When the CRX hit the market, it was an affordable car that was unique. With various model ranges and options available, your average consumer could afford a CRX. Fast forward to today's age; with enough knowledge and money you can build a CRX that will put down some serious numbers on the dragstrip. The CRX will always have a special spot within car culture, I see no end in sight when it comes the possibilities or creativity behind these builds.

Again, these are just five cars from the 1980s that I believe are worth mentioning. Feel free to let me know what you think should have made the list. Thanks for reading.

No items found.
Slim
Writer

Motorsport enthusiast with a love for the world of drifting.

My Top 5 Cars Of The 80s
8 min read

My Top 5 Cars Of The 80s

Featured Builds
Aug 25
/
8 min read

The 1980s produced some of the most incredible vehicles made in the Japanese Domestic Market (JDM). Over the span of 10 years, several critical technological advances were made, new EPA standards were introduced, and Japanese Automanufactures were producing not just economy vehicles but performance-inspired ones as well. Here is a quick list of my top 10, in no particular order.

#1) FB/SA and FC Mazda RX7s


Technically, the first generation of RX7 was produced in the late 1970s, but let's forget that for a second. From 1978 to 1985, the first generation of RX7 was a force to be reckoned with during its release. Equipped with a Wankel Rotary engine, which Mazda has become synonymous with, this car introduced not-so-old technology to a new market. You can find this chassis competing in various motorsports, from drag racing, drifting to road racing; it has undoubtedly made a name for itself.
The FC (second generation) of RX7 hit the market in the mid-1980s into the 2000s. The FC chassis is iconic, if you ask me. I'm sure we have all seen the Initial D memes (that was me, I still watch it with my kids), but Initial D didn't make the chassis what it is today. The everyday enthusiasts and professional shops who have pushed this chassis and its powerplants to their limits are what makes this model special. The Turbo II model will go down in history as one of Mazda's greatest chassis' (looking at you FD kids), even if they can be generally found on jack stands or a lift.

@simp.ai on Instagram
2) Toyota Supra (not the Fast and Furious one)


The Toyota Supra will always be a mainstay in Toyota's stable. We know of the Supra featured in the Fast and Furious film, but there the true hero, in my opinion, is the MA70. The MA70 featured a straight-six twin-turbocharged engine titled the 7M-GTE. Think of this as the 1JZ-GTE's older, weird cousin that packed a punch. The 7M-GTE produced about 230hp and 196lb-ft of torque. The A70 Supra's had flat front ends, pop-up headlights and were equipped with a hardtop, sunroof, or T-Tops.

@valormk3
3) Toyota MR2


The second generation of MR2, SW20s, is probably the most popular generation of MR2. Before the SW20 came to life, the first generation of MR2 was building the future for MR2 enthusiasts to come. The AW11 chassis was boxy, small, and highly nimble. Being produced with a 1.6L NA engine, the 4AGE, Toyota also offered a supercharged model from the factory. The supercharged engine, the 4AGZE, certainly was not the most potent powerplant in that era. However, this Roots-type supercharged produced a whopping 145hp from the factory in a vehicle that weighed only 2500lbs.

@mk1_mr2_supercharger
4) Nissan 280z


In my opinion (don't come at me), the Nissan 280z was one of Nissan's greatest productions cars, next to the GTR. The 280z carried on the 240z's roots, even after losing the Datsun name in the early 1980s. The 280z had the option of a turbocharged engine in 1980, boosting horsepower numbers to about 197hp. The iconic front end, a slight protrusion from the hood, recessed headlights, and overall sleek design was a fresh take on sports cars in the 1980s.

@datzilla_78
5) Honda CRX


Yes, you read that correctly. I love the Honda CRX. If there is one thing that almost every car enthusiast can relate to, it's money. It costs a metric f*ck ton of money to build a project car. The aftermarket Honda community has been able to produce quality parts for various Honda platforms that are affordable. The Honda CRX has a cult-like following of enthusiasts (in a good way). When the CRX hit the market, it was an affordable car that was unique. With various model ranges and options available, your average consumer could afford a CRX. Fast forward to today's age; with enough knowledge and money you can build a CRX that will put down some serious numbers on the dragstrip. The CRX will always have a special spot within car culture, I see no end in sight when it comes the possibilities or creativity behind these builds.

Again, these are just five cars from the 1980s that I believe are worth mentioning. Feel free to let me know what you think should have made the list. Thanks for reading.

No items found.
Slim
Writer

Motorsport enthusiast with a love for the world of drifting.