Toyota's 1JZ-GTE Powerhouse
5 min read

Toyota's 1JZ-GTE Powerhouse

Tech - Kind Of
8/29/2021
/
5 min read

Toyota's 1JZ-GTE – The Swap You Cannot Deny

Toyota has produced iconic engines throughout the years, many still being used by enthusiasts today. Everything from the 1.6L four-cylinder 4AGE engine found in everyone's favorite animated togue killer, the 86 (and MR2), to the 4.0L V8, 1UZ-FE. In between those two extremes lies the JZ engine family. The 1JZ and 2JZ engines can be found in numerous Toyota cars throughout the 90s and early 2000s. Coming in both naturally aspired form and turbocharged, you have options (not really, who doesn't want a turbo?).

For today's article, we are going to focus on the 1JZ-GTE and 2JZ-GTE platforms. I'm biased toward the 1JZ-GTE Non VVT-I models, but that is because I am swapping one into one of my projects. The 1JZ-GTE came in chassis such as the Chaser, Soarer, and Supra.  The first generation of 1JZ's to hit the market were twin-turbocharged, 2.5L inline 6-cylinder's rated for approximately 276HP and 268ft-lbs of torque. This DOHC, 24-valve engine had a compression ratio of 8.5:1 and made peak power around 6200 rotations per minute (RPM). It wasn't until the mid-90s that variable valve timing was introduced, and a transition from twin turbochargers to a single turbo was brought to market. The introduction of Toyota's VVT-I system, a reworked head, and change to a single turbocharger brought the torque rating up to 280ft-lbs at a much lower RPM.

Aftermarket parts for the 1JZ-GTE are still readily available today. You can build yourself a 1000hp 1JZ engine with the right parts and skilled labor. Right up until COIVD-19 reared its ugly head, prices of Non VVT-I 1JZ-GTEs imported from Japan were reasonably priced. Given its proven record to take abuse on the track, the availability of the aftermarket parts, and potential power, it was an excellent option for those looking for a dedicated track powerplant. With the introduction of the VVT-I system, Toyota engineers were able to offer variable valve timing to the 1JZ platform. This brought power and torque in at noticeably lower RPMs, giving drivers access to a broader powerband. While variable valve timing comes standard on many engines these days, this was a massive accomplishment for the time.

You can find 1JZ swaps in various chassis, from E36s to FD/FC RX7s; it has proven to be a reliable power source for enthusiasts. Costs vary depending on the chassis and the current market of 1JZ engines. Many companies make swap kits for more popular chassis, taking out a lot of the DIY enthusiast's guesswork. I recently purchased a non VVT-i core from an importer and will be documenting the rebuild as I go. This engine will find a new home within my 1987 Mazda RX7 Turbo 2.

Feel free to let me know what engine swap you think rivals the 1JZ.

No items found.
Slim
Writer

Motorsport enthusiast with a love for the world of drifting.

Toyota's 1JZ-GTE Powerhouse
5 min read

Toyota's 1JZ-GTE Powerhouse

Tech - Kind Of
Aug 29
/
5 min read

Toyota's 1JZ-GTE – The Swap You Cannot Deny

Toyota has produced iconic engines throughout the years, many still being used by enthusiasts today. Everything from the 1.6L four-cylinder 4AGE engine found in everyone's favorite animated togue killer, the 86 (and MR2), to the 4.0L V8, 1UZ-FE. In between those two extremes lies the JZ engine family. The 1JZ and 2JZ engines can be found in numerous Toyota cars throughout the 90s and early 2000s. Coming in both naturally aspired form and turbocharged, you have options (not really, who doesn't want a turbo?).

For today's article, we are going to focus on the 1JZ-GTE and 2JZ-GTE platforms. I'm biased toward the 1JZ-GTE Non VVT-I models, but that is because I am swapping one into one of my projects. The 1JZ-GTE came in chassis such as the Chaser, Soarer, and Supra.  The first generation of 1JZ's to hit the market were twin-turbocharged, 2.5L inline 6-cylinder's rated for approximately 276HP and 268ft-lbs of torque. This DOHC, 24-valve engine had a compression ratio of 8.5:1 and made peak power around 6200 rotations per minute (RPM). It wasn't until the mid-90s that variable valve timing was introduced, and a transition from twin turbochargers to a single turbo was brought to market. The introduction of Toyota's VVT-I system, a reworked head, and change to a single turbocharger brought the torque rating up to 280ft-lbs at a much lower RPM.

Aftermarket parts for the 1JZ-GTE are still readily available today. You can build yourself a 1000hp 1JZ engine with the right parts and skilled labor. Right up until COIVD-19 reared its ugly head, prices of Non VVT-I 1JZ-GTEs imported from Japan were reasonably priced. Given its proven record to take abuse on the track, the availability of the aftermarket parts, and potential power, it was an excellent option for those looking for a dedicated track powerplant. With the introduction of the VVT-I system, Toyota engineers were able to offer variable valve timing to the 1JZ platform. This brought power and torque in at noticeably lower RPMs, giving drivers access to a broader powerband. While variable valve timing comes standard on many engines these days, this was a massive accomplishment for the time.

You can find 1JZ swaps in various chassis, from E36s to FD/FC RX7s; it has proven to be a reliable power source for enthusiasts. Costs vary depending on the chassis and the current market of 1JZ engines. Many companies make swap kits for more popular chassis, taking out a lot of the DIY enthusiast's guesswork. I recently purchased a non VVT-i core from an importer and will be documenting the rebuild as I go. This engine will find a new home within my 1987 Mazda RX7 Turbo 2.

Feel free to let me know what engine swap you think rivals the 1JZ.

No items found.
Slim
Writer

Motorsport enthusiast with a love for the world of drifting.